National Exhibits

 
 
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PORTRAIT MONUMENT TO LUCRETIA MOTT, ELIZABETH CADY STANTON AND SUSAN B. ANTHONY

This group portrait monument to the pioneers of the woman suffrage movement, which won women the right to vote in 1920, was sculpted from an 8-ton block of marble in Carrara, Italy. The monument features portrait busts of three movement leaders: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Lucretia Mott.

Hours: 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday

Location: Capitol Building

First Street NE, Washington, DC 20515

 
 
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VOTES FOR WOMEn: A PORTRAIT OF PERSISTENCE

The National Portrait Gallery honors the centennial of the ratification of the 19th Amendment with this highly anticipated exhibit. You’ll learn about the radical women that fought slavery, the women activists of the late 1800s, the “New Woman” of the 20th century and the relentless suffragists of the 1910s through a series of portraits, cultural artifacts and biographies. The exhibit will also examine the struggles that minority women still face today, 100 years after the 19th Amendment passed. Find even more ways to celebrate the achievements of women in DC.

Hours: 11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m.; exhibit running daily until January 5, 2020

Location: National Portrait Gallery

8th and F Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001

 
 
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ALL WORK AND NO PAY: A HISTORY OF WOMEN’S INVISIBLE LABOR’

This exhibit at the National Museum of American History will highlight women’s work in the home and the corresponding issue of unwaged labor. “Costumes” for domestic work ranging from colonial times to the 1990s will show how women are expected to manage the housework regardless of class, race, culture or community. Visitors will be able to learn the inequality and unfairness of this outdated societal assumption through artifacts and images.

Hours: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.; exhibit running daily until February 2020

Location: National Museum of American History


14th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW
Washington, DC

 
 
 
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American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith

What happens when a people decide to govern themselves? America’s national treasures come to life in this compelling exhibition that examines the bold experiment to create a government “of the people, by the people, and for the people.”

American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith explores the history of citizen participation, debate, and compromise from the nation’s formation to today. Through objects such as Thomas Jefferson’s portable desk, used to draft the Declaration of Independence; the inkstand Lincoln used to draft the Emancipation Proclamation; and the table on which Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, the exhibition focuses on the changing political ideals and principles of the nation, citizenship in a pluralistic society, and political participation and engagement.

Hours: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.; daily

Location: National Museum of American History

Constitution Avenue, NW Between 12th and 14th Streets
Washington, D.C.

 
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Rightfully Hers: American Women and the Vote exhibit

The National Archives invites you to browse the wealth of records and information documenting the women's rights movement in the US, including photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, exhibits, articles, blog posts, lectures and events.

Hours: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.; exhibit running daily until Sunday, January 3, 2021

Location: National Archives Museum

701 Constitution Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20408

 
 
 
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Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

The exhibition draws from the Library’s extensive collections of personal papers and organizational records of such figures as Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Church Terrell, Carrie Chapman Catt, the National Woman’s Party, the National American Woman Suffrage Association and others. Documents, images, video and audio recordings will trace the movement leading to the women’s rights convention at Seneca Falls, the contributions of suffragists who worked to persuade women that they deserved the same rights as men, the divergent political strategies and internal divisions they overcame, the push for a federal women’s suffrage amendment and the legacy of this movement.

“Shall Not Be Denied” is part of the national commemoration of the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage, marking major milestones in 2019 and 2020. The exhibition will open on the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Senate’s passage of the suffrage amendment that would become the 19th amendment to the Constitution once ratification by the states was certified on Aug. 26, 1920.

Hours: 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Monday – Saturday until sept 2020

Location: Library of Congress

101 Independence Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20540

 

Other DC Exhibits

 
 
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ORDINARY EQUALITY: DAR MEMBERS AND THE ROAD TO WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE, 1890-1920

The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Museum & Archives invites you to observe how members of the organization took advantage of increased opportunities for women to participate in social reform activities, in turn helping to make the dream of women’s voting rights a reality. Inside, you will find biographies, correspondence and photographs from the DAR archives that highlight the tremendous accomplishments of more than 40 women.

Hours:8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; exhibit running daily until January 27, 2021

Location: DAR Museum & Archives

1776 D Street NW, Washington, DC 20006

 

Submit your museum’s suffrage exhibit or inclusion on the WVCI Website. Email info@2020centennial.org